Acsa Agreement India

Amid rising tensions between India and China along the Line of Effective Control, which is likely to intensify, the Indian Navy will have access to the Japanese base in Djibouti with CASA with Japan and the Japanese will have access to the Andamans and Nicotics. Similarly, the Indian press release said the agreement would contribute to «peace and security in the Indo-Pacific region.» New Delhi: A week before Shinzo Abe`s resignation, Prime Minister Narendra Modi spoke of common memories with his «dear friend» and announced the signing of the long-awaited military-logistics agreement. The agreement provides the Japanese Self-Defense Forces and the Indian Armed Forces with a framework for each other`s supply of stocks and services, including food, fuel and spare parts, as well as for the transportation and use of each other`s facilities during joint exercises and UN peacekeeping operations. The genesis of the LSA can be found in the strategic partnership document signed by the two countries in March 2006 during US President George W. Bush`s visit to New Delhi. The document states that the United States and India will soon sign an agreement to facilitate mutual logistical assistance in combined training, exercises and disaster relief operations. The envisaged agreement was part of increased cooperation in the field of maritime security, counter-terrorism, defence trade and efforts to conclude the fissile material demarcation treaty expedited. Subsequently, as other areas of bilateral security cooperation developed, discussions on LSAs continued at a snail`s pace, with India invoking domestic policy constraints to rebrand the agreement. Currently, the LSA has been before the Cabinet Security Committee for more than six months for unblocking. The third clause of Article 2 of the agreement expressly states that this list of services «shall not be interpreted to include the supply of arms or ammunition by the Japan Self-Defense Forces or by the Indian Armed Forces.» Just under two years after starting formal negotiations on the issue after a management-level summit in October 2018, India and Japan concluded their Acquisition and Cross-Service Agreement (ACSA) last week. Like the Logistics Exchange Memorandum of Understanding (LEMOA) with the United States and the ACSA agreements that New Delhi has with five other countries, the bilateral agreement will allow the armed forces of the two countries «to exchange supplies and services on a reciprocal basis during exercises in which they both participate,» as Abhjinan Rej of The Diplomat explains. As previously reported by Financial Express Online, AcSA (AcSA) will have access to the provision of supplies and services during bilateral exercises and trainings, UN peacekeeping operations and other humanitarian activities.

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